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Favorite Flowers Throughout History

Written By: Amy E Page

How bleak the world would be without flowers! But their beauty and fragrance are only part of their charm. Sources of food and medicine, the stars of countless festivals worldwide, they are also symbols of love, friendship, and such in many countries. An absorbing hobby, a livelihood for some farmers, growers, and exporters, they brighten our lives and cheer us whether in public or home gardens, or as gifts and remembrances.

Top favorites:

(1) Roses are Americans’ favorite, according to ehow.com/list, also of most of the world, and have been
for centuries. Red roses are the top seller for Valentine’s Day where celebrated, symbolizing love,
beauty, and romance. Legend says that Eros, the Greek god of love, his name an anagram for “rose”,
gave the world its first rose. So popular are roses that their colors have developed special meanings.

(2) The pansy, beloved and widespread, is the main contender for world’s favorite after the rose according to sfgate.com. Legend says the pansy’s typical three colors symbolize the Holy Trinity.

(3) Chrysanthemums, with their astounding variety of colors, sizes, and shapes, is Japan’s favorite, says examiner.com, other than cherry tree blossoms. “Kiku” meaning “sun” is also the word for chrysanthemums. This regard began in the 12th century when mums became a symbol of power. China, too, adores chrysanthemums where they appear everywhere and are featured in numerous festivals. Tradition says the mum has magical powers when picked on the ninth day of the ninth month. Peonies are another Chinese favorite, and in 1994 a nationwide survey chose the tree peony as the nation’s favorite, says china.org.cn/english.

(4) Tulips are Holland’s favorite, as most of the world knows, where they are grown and exported in huge quantities to a worldwide market. According to flowers-best.blogspot.com, Turkey, also, claims the tulip as its national favorite.

(5) Chamomile, Russia’s favorite, is a West African native and member of the daisy family, says theflowerexpert.com, a flower with many medicinal applications. Russians also favor roses, orchids, carnations, chrysanthemums, and lilies as gifts for holidays and special occasions. Frozen Russians must greet spring flowers with particular joy and relief!

(6) Marigolds, a West African native, are found in gardens and greenhouses everywhere. They became popular in England at the height of the Victorian era’s fascination with gardens and gardening, a popularity that has never waned, according to lyonsltd.com.

Favorite flowers throughout history are the rose, tulip, pansy, and chrysanthemum, but many nations have an official favorite flower, typically chosen by the people. Austrians favor edelweiss, Hong Kong the orchid, and Spain the red carnation. Syria and Indonesia favor jasmine while lavender is Portugal’s favorite, another medicinal flower. Australians love the golden wattle, while most of the Middle East favors the large-blossomed, intensely colored poppy. India’s favorite, the lotus, appears widely in Hindu traditions and art. The variety of favorites worldwide indicates a deep human love for flowers, a love that is timeless! Enjoy them!